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Recap

It was one of those rounds where I wish I could have it back to do again. Three putt on on the first and last holes. Two balls in the water on critical holes. Take those shots and make them how I normally play and my 83 is a 79. From that standpoint, I have a lot that I can hold my head high about.

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As it is we ended with a tie for third. Stupid mistakes along the way. My partner picked up on #14 when he was receiving a handicap stroke because he thought he couldn’t beat my par. That’s part of this problem with the culture of ‘pick up’ is in my experience it’s only a matter of time before it bites you in the ass. That one stroke right there – would have had us in 2nd place. But, honestly, with the way that I played, I shouldn’t be complaining.

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I just couldn’t get things going. Missing some greens, hitting some errant tee shots, and trying to hard with my putter.

What’s on the horizon though…..

Member-Guest coming up next month.

Club Championship.

Interestingly – we did have a rules question. A golf ball came to rest about two feet up in a tree stump. My fellow competitor deemed there was a squirrel mound and wanted to take relief siting an abnormal ground condition.

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Basically, to summarize, you cannot take relief from an abnormal ground condition if you’re using it to create a better stroke for yourself from one where it’s impossible for you to have one.

Example:

In stroke play, Tammy’s ball lies under a bush and it is clearly impracticable for her to play any stroke at it. However, her ball lies against a mound made by burrowing animals. What is the ruling?
A) Tammy may take relief, without penalty, from the abnormal ground condition even if this also gives her relief from the bush.
B) Tammy may take relief from the abnormal ground condition and then decide whether to play her ball or follow the procedure for ball unplayable, incurring a penalty of one stroke.
C) Tammy must take relief from both the abnormal ground condition and the bush, within two club-lengths of where her ball lies, incurring a penalty of two strokes.
D) Tammy must either play her ball as it lies or follow the procedure for ball unplayable, incurring a penalty of one stroke.
Answer: D) Tammy must either play her ball as it lies or follow the procedure for ball unplayable, incurring a penalty of one stroke. Decision 25-1b/19.
Note: Tammy is not entitled to relief from the mound made by burrowing animals because it is clearly impracticable for her to play a stroke due to interference by the bush. See Exception to Rule 25-1b.

 

Analog at Birth, Digital by Design

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